Gulf Oil Monarchies Bully Lebanon Over Syria Stance

Arab League Secretary General Nabil al-Arabi (L) and Lebanese Foreign Affairs Minister Adnan Mansur (R) talk during the opening session of the Arab foreign minister meeting in Cairo on 6 March 2013. (Photo: AFP - Gianluigi Guercia)

By: Hassan Illeik

Published Thursday, March 7, 2013

It is no coincidence that Algeria and Iraq were the only two countries at the 6 March 2013 Arab League meeting in Cairo that objected to the proposal to arm the Syrian opposition.

Their opposition did not merely reflect their overall political stance, or their ties with the resistance axis in the region. They also happen to be the only two Arab states that are capable – thanks to their own oil and gas resources – of refusing to do the bidding of Gulf oil monarchies.

Neither is it a coincidence that a bevy of Lebanese political groups mobilized yesterday to attack Lebanese Minister of Foreign Affairs Adnan Mansour over his stance on Syria.

With the brazenness of a bully, the Gulf states yesterday threatened Lebanon with economic and security consequences if it does not adhere to its policy of “dissociation” from the crisis in Syria.

The implied economic threat is clear. They are hinting that they will expel Lebanese workers from their countries if stances are taken in Lebanon that oppose their policies in Syria.

Less clear is the security threat. Are they promising to send us their mujahideen to fight for freedom as defined by al-Nusra Front? Or will they open a Beirut franchise of their gun-running operation in Syria?

What Mansour actually did in Cairo was to adhere genuinely to the dissociation policy. The only stance the minister took was an ethical one in favor of a peaceful solution in Syria, and of Damascus retaking its seat at the Arab League so that dialogue can begin in Cairo.

The Gulf regimes, committed to implementing US Secretary of State John Kerry’s agenda of more blood and destruction in Syria, disapproved of Mansour’s stance. For them, “dissociation” means turning a blind eye to an influx of arms intended to destroy an Arab country.

Mansour’s sin was to call for peace at a time when every other country is pushing for war. His greater sin was to flout his obligation of submission and obedience to the ordained rulers of the oil monarchies.

This article is an edited translation from the Arabic Edition.

Comments

Lebanon's answer to the 3arab blackmail is to go to hell or will bring hell to you.

Tfuh 'ala al'Arab

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd><img><h1><h2><h3><h4><h5><h6><blockquote><span><aside>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

More information about formatting options

^ Back to Top