Israel urges US, EU to back Egypt's military crackdown

Published Monday, August 19, 2013

Israel and the West must support Egypt's army to regain control of the country and prevent jihadists from taking over, an Israeli official told a local newspaper in remarks published late-Sunday.

The unnamed official's comments came a day after a New York Times report said that Israel would press the United States and European Union to support the military in unrest-swept Egypt.

“The name of the game right now is not democracy,” the Jerusalem Post quoted the official as saying. “The name of the game is that there needs to be a functioning state."

“You can scold [Gen. Abdel Fattah el-] Sisi all you wish, but at the end of the day, you want a functional government to rule the country,” he added.

Over 800 people have been killed in Egypt since Wednesday when the military launched a massive crackdown on Islamist supporters of deposed president Mohammed Mursi.

US President Barack Obama last week cancelled joint military exercises following the deaths.

But Washington has not suspended military aid to Egypt, a key Middle East ally which maintains warm relations with Israel.

The US administration has refused to call Mursi's overthrow a "coup," which would legally require it to cut off aid, saying it hoped to steer the country towards a democratic transition.

The bloodshed in Egypt has drawn widespread international condemnation, with senior European Union diplomats holding emergency talks on Monday to discuss future EU action.

(AFP, Al-Akhbar)

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Strange Bedfellows: The Unholy Trinity of Gulf Sheikhdoms, the Fulool, and Egypt’s Secular Opposition

On April 22, 2011, UAE Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Zayed brought his intelligence and security chiefs to meet with King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia and his security officials to discuss the ramifications of the Arab Spring.

Bin Zayed warned that unless the GCC countries developed a proactive policy to preempt the wave of popular uprisings sweeping the Arab World at the time, none of the region’s monarchs would survive.

Three weeks later in an emergency summit meeting in Riyadh he delivered the same message to all the GCC heads of state.

For decades, the UAE had been very close to Mubarak and his cronies. Billions of dollars of ill-gotten fortunes looted from the country were deposited in banks in Abu Dhabi and Dubai. After the overthrow of Mubarak, dozens of security officials and corrupt businessmen quietly left Egypt and relocated to the UAE.

When Mubarak’s last Prime Minister, Ahmad Shafiq lost the presidential elections to Morsi in June 2012, he also moved to the UAE. By the fall of 2012, it became evident that the UAE hosted a web of individuals who were plotting the overthrow of Morsi and the MB.

Even though Morsi took the reins of powers in the country and was able to force the retirement of the most senior army generals in early August, his authority was thin.

Instead of purging the most entrenched elements of Mubarak’s centers of power, namely, the army, the intelligence services, the security apparatus, and the police, he naïvely thought that he could appease them.

Wealthy Arabs have bribed Billions to over throw the elected Egyptian Govt. of Egypt And the reason is NOT failure of Morsi's democracy and lack of developments.

This has been the case with very many countries that have elections and a sort of democracy

India and Pakistan and Bangladesh are some good examples.

They have had about 6 decades of incompetent democracy,
Parliamentarians, politicians and civil servants have been making huge money by corruption

But 60% of the people in the rural have no treated continued drinking water supply, sewerage and basic medical facility,

But critics of Egyptian democracy want miracles to happen in Egyptian economy within two years

And with vested foreign interest they bribed the army and over threw the elected Govt That is the issue.

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